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Water collection by honey bees

Water has several uses in a honey bee hive. During certain times of the year foragers find a source of water, fill their crops, and ferry it home. The number of bees foraging for water depends on the needs of the colony. If the in-hive workers accept the water quickly from the foragers, the foraging […] Read more

Nectar collection by honey bees

While folks envision industrious honey bees bringing home loads of silken nectar, they often don’t account for the other payloads that arrive on the landing board. Honey bees actually collect three other substances: pollen, water, and propolis. Today’s post is a brief overview of nectar collection. Later I’ll write about the other three. Nectar is […] Read more

Make room for mason bees

My first shipment of orchard mason bees arrived in shiny little tubes that look like drinking straws, packed in a box that weighs next to nothing. So why am I messing with mason bees in the midst of a million honey bees? The answer is partly because they’re native—I encourage native species whenever I can—and […] Read more

Urban beekeeping webinar

Yesterday I tuned into a fascinating webinar called “Urban Beekeeping: Ins and Outs; Dos and Don’ts.” The webinar was moderated by Shane Gebauer of Brushy Mountain Bee Farm and featured Toni Burnham (http://citybees.blogspot.com), Cameo Wood, Cindy Bee, and Kim Flottum (http://BeeCulture.com). Although the material was designed for new urban beekeepers, the issues raised were compelling […] Read more

All beekeeping challenges are local

Last night I was fortunate to meet Fritz Haeg, author of Edible Estates: Attack on the Front Lawn (www.fritzhaeg.com). After an open-to-the-public lecture on edible landscapes and animal estates, Haeg led our classroom through an informal discussion of art, architecture, and vegetable gardens. Haeg is funny, articulate, and brimming with fresh ideas on Americans and […] Read more

How I Use an IR Camera for BeekeepingAn Interview with FLIR
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