English for beekeepers

With that title, I can hear my ratings tumble like rocks from a precipice. Certain words invoke sheer boredom in beekeepers; “English” is one, “physics” is another. Although my “Physics for beekeepers” series is my personal favorite, it certainly is not yours. I don’t expect “English for beekeepers” to fare much better.

My complaint is that many beekeepers—by no means all—use words that mean different things to different people. That in itself is fine, except that it is impossible to communicate when there is no agreement on meaning. As a writer, it is my job to communicate. Readers expect writers to convey information or stories in a way they can understand.

Flexible definitions lead to mushy, unclear thinking, and unclear thinking leads to miscommunication. For example, the terms median and mean have very specific definitions to scientists and mathematicians. If I say “mean” when I meant “median,” the information I’ve communicated is wrong, even if the two values are identical. Huh?

Never mind, here’s an example closer to home. I once met a beekeeper who had just put her two honey supers under her two brood boxes. When I asked her why, she said her mentor told her to reverse her supers. Now in a world where all bee boxes are inexplicably called supers, I suppose this made sense. She understood the word “super” incorrectly because her mentor used it incorrectly—and that lead to miscommunication and the wrong outcome. Poor bees.

Similarly, about three years later a beekeeper I knew “reversed” his brood boxes by turning them 180 degrees. Can you blame him? The word “reverse” all by itself doesn’t mean much unless someone explains, and we beekeepers are notoriously bad at explaining.

A few months ago I wrote about the words “colony” and “hive.” You can compare them to “family” and “house.” A colony lives in a hive just as a family lives in a house. Hives do not abscond. Hives do not swarm. Hives do not starve or die. Instead, hives are inanimate objects that don’t do much of anything. We accept this sloppy wording after a while because we know what we mean. But for someone who is just learning, this type of language is incomprehensible.

Lots of confusing terms come to mind:

    • People say nuc, when they mean a small brood box, but a nuc is a small colony (a nucleus colony). It is a nuc regardless of the size of the box it’s in. Conversely, if a small brood box is empty, it’s not a nuc, it’s just a small box. Such an empty box can be called a “nuc box,” but not a “nuc.”
    • A cluster is not a swarm. “During the winter, the swarm moved to the top of the hive.” Wrong. That bunch of bees is a cluster or colony.
    • Caste does not mean sex. Honey bees have two sexes, male and female, and the female sex is divided into two castes, workers and queens. This yields three types of bees (three adult phenotypes) but not three castes.
    • Ill-tempered does not mean Africanized. Ill-tempered bees could be Africanized, but most are not.
    • Swarm cells and supersedure cells are built in different places for different purposes; they are not equivalent. When someone says “queen cell,” which one do they mean?

Of course, the all-time most irritating word in all of beedom is super. Super is short for superstructure. You can’t have a superstructure (which means “above the structure”) unless you first have a structure. All boxes cannot go above something that’s not there. You have brood boxes and supers. Brood boxes are the basic structure of the hive and contain the brood; supers go above the brood boxes and hold the honey. Simple and drop-dead logical. Why is that so confusing?

If anyone is still awake, I have one more complaint. Recently I saw the abbreviation SBB used to mean “screened bottom board.” Two months later in the same publication SBB was used to mean “solid bottom board.” Just think about it; to help control Varroa mites you should use an SBB instead of an SBB. But everyone knows that, right?

Rusty
HoneyBeeSuite

Comments

HB
Reply

Enjoyed today’s blog. You tell ‘em, Rusty!

JoAnne
Reply

Love it! Just taught a class and remembered your blog about colony vs. hive so I was extra careful there. Thanks for adding more terms. “Super” for every box has been a personal pet peeve of mine also. One beekeeper told me they were taught that all boxes were called supers. They were told to put “deep supers” on the bottom and “shallow supers” on the top. Go figure.

Dave Strickler
Reply

As a relatively new beek, thank you, thank you for calling this out. The hardest part of getting into beekeeping was deciphering the “bee-speak”. Trying to learn, while reading things about “supers” and abbreviations like “SBB” drove me nuts!

And to make it even worse, I am guilty of perpetuating the problem on my own blog. Maybe I should go back and edit my work ;-)

ScoobyDoBee
Reply

I’m guilty of this – especially “his hive died,” and super. All my boxes are mediums so some of my mediums (or supers) are USED as brood boxes while others are actually used as supers… Even tho they are all the size of a super. Dandy. That’s just super. :). I do love this tho, Rusty. Local vernacular adds that certain something…

Nancy
Reply

Rusty –
Brava! ;-)
Imprecision leads to mistakes! (Omitting 18 examples from non-chemical weed management.) Keep up this theme, and I will cite it the next time someone accuses me of nitpicking.
(Nuc box! Nuc box! Nuc box!)
Thanks!
Nan

Janet
Reply

I have a dilemma. I overwintered my hives in 2 deeps and added a super of honey for good measure. Our WI winters are hard. I checked them last week and they were at the top of the super. I had 2 honey supers in the garage that I had kept for just such an emergency. We had a sunny 45-degree day last week so I put them on.

My dilemma is how do I get them back into the brood boxes? I really don’t want to go into egg laying by putting the two honey supers on the bottom. Can I use a fume board? If I shake them out I could injure the queen. What is your recommendation? Thanks.

Rusty
Reply

Janet,

If you don’t want the queen to lay eggs in the honey supers, you can put a queen excluder between the brood boxes and the honey supers. The workers will go up to get food and bring it down, but the queen and cluster will stay below. If the bees want to move some of the honey stores down closer to the cluster, they will.

If the queen is already up in the supers, just find her and move her down below the queen excluder. Everyone else will follow her down. Alternatively, you may be able to smoke them all down or use a fume board, and then put the excluder on.

Nancy
Reply

Rusty:

I was probably a little less than tactful here. Going over to help out with 2 hives at a Nature Academy in the next county, we were met by the director/instructor, who explained one of the colonies had died – “Wax worms got’em.”

How would YOU explain tactfully to someone who teaches science, including bee science, to school groups, that they aren’t worms, they’re larvae, and that they didn’t “get” the hive, they just took advantage of a weakness?

BTW it was something serious, probably queenlessness. The wax moths were quite a small infestation: maybe 10% of two frames in one medium out of two. The dead cluster were the size of a grapefruit, and were all in top frames 8-9. No sign of brood and no honey anywhere. Does that sound as if they lost their queen and just died out? Thanks!
Nan

Rusty
Reply

Nan,

Without being able to take a look, it sounds to me like the queen failed, so I agree.

As for the rest, that is exactly what I mean my muddled thinking. Does the person know the difference between a worm and a larva? Does he care? Does he really want to know what killed the colony, or is he trying to flaunt his vast knowledge (which obviously failed).

It sounds like he was trying to make an impression on young minds rather than teach them anything. Or maybe he thinks they are so young he doesn’t need to bother with the truth. Big mistake.

What did you say to him?

Nancy
Reply

Rusty,

Oh, glad you think so too (about the queen loss).

Well, I said flat out, “I’m sorry – this is a science facility, so I have to point out, these are NOT worms. Worms are a separate phylum – like earthworms? – and are worms in their adult form. These are larvae, the young of a moth.”

Luckily my neighbor who is starting beekeeping was along too, so she and I had a discussion, in his hearing, of what really killed the colony. I just said that wasn’t much moth, that a strong ahem, colony could protect itself, and they probably came in because the ahem, colony, was weak. Helpfully, the director did mention that they had swarmed earlier in the season. So we could speculate that the stay-behind queen had not gotten fertilized, had been killed on her mating flight or the workers had rejected her.

I think the previous volunteer may have been less diligent. I’ve already offered to come when there’s a school group and do the beehive part.

In my old age I find that offering to help is better than arguing to get correct information into circulation. I’m doing the minutes for our club, and so I appreciate your reminders about terms and will do my best to work them in wherever possible.

And you’re right, I didn’t have enough hobbies!
Take care!
Nan

PS: Have you read Rudyard Kipling’s “The Mother Hive”? That is where I learned about wax moth, 30 years before ever getting bees.

Rusty
Reply

No, I haven’t read it but I just found it at the free library, so I will read it right now.

Robert
Reply

Rusty,

What do I call the boxes I just made in my shop? Just deep boxes, medium boxes, etc? I really would like to keep the terminology proper as we (some friends and I) are just starting up our hives. Reducing confusion is always a plus.

Rusty
Reply

Robert,

How deep are they, top to bottom?

Robert
Reply

Some are 9 5/8″ deep and some are 6 5/8″ deep. I also made a couple of 3″ spacers.

Rusty
Reply

Robert,

In that case you have deep boxes, medium boxes, and ekes. If they are meant to house brood, then they are brood boxes, either deep brood boxes or medium brood boxes. If they are meant to hold honey that you will harvest, they are supers: they could be deep supers (unlikely but possible) or medium supers. An eke is meant to “eke out” some extra space in the hive. They can hold anything that goes above the hive. You can use them as feeders, quilts, ventilators, or just spacers for mite treatments, etc. Does that answer your question?

Keller-Braun
Reply

Rusty,

This was a great read with my morning coffee! I taught English for 20 years and I began beekeeping April 2013. Being able to relate to the frustrations with both issues, I roared with laughter as I read. (It doesn’t take much to amuse me.) What a relief to know I’m not the only one that is so particular about the use and application of terminology.

My day begins before sunrise with a cup of coffee and Honey Bee Suite. Thank you for making this possible!

Rusty
Reply

High praise, indeed. Thank you!

Michelle
Reply

Thank you for writing this. Bees are next on my homesteading wish list. I’ve been reading about bee keeping for years. Your post helped me a lot!!!

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